What is Full spectrum ?

Hello friends, so, now that we in the medicinal cannabis practice advocate the use
of full spectrum oils over isolates and other forms, I have this question for you , experts in extraction techniques : What do you understand by Full Spectrum ? What must be taken out of your extract for it to be called still a full spectrum ? Solvent yes if alcohol, but what else do you not want in there?
Thanks
Angel

Comments

  • AngelAngel
    edited November 7

    Well, no wonder I see no answer considering that the C. sativa plant has over 500 compounds,( modified sugars, terpenoids, stilbenoids, quinones, flavonoids etc etc.) of which cannabinoids make up just about 100, to date. That´ s why I posed the question the other way, which compounds can or must be taken out and still call the end product a "full spectrum" one.

  • You raise a good point in that there is not quantitative definition of "full-spectrum". To me, and for Heylo, full-spectrum is as "close to the plant" as possible. A full-spectrum oil has similar ratios of testable cannabinoids and terpenes as were found in the starting material.

    Now, how do you define "similar"? That's another question open to debate.

  • So according to that, we are using the term full spectrum just based on wether it has the terpens and cannabinoids alone because that is what we are looking for?

  • At this time, these are the compounds that are most-readily accessible for testing by third parties. Over time I expect other compounds like flavonoids to play into the mix to give us a better picture of how much of the plant has been preserved.

    But yes, I agree, there is no fine-line or concrete definition for "what is full-spectrum?".

  • This is just my opinion but the only thing I consider full spectrum is Rick Simpson Oil as it has all the plant properties and has not been separated is any way. I do NOT consider a product full spectrum if it has been separated and recombined. You said it if it doesn't contain everything you stated to me it is not full spectrum.

  • I’d still consider a winterized RSO as full spectrum since the lipids are of low medical efficacy. Anything that is not super dark is wide spectrum at best, but may still contain a full compliment of flavonoids, terpenoids, etc.

  • @Angel said:
    Hello friends, so, now that we in the medicinal cannabis practice advocate the use
    of full spectrum oils over isolates and other forms, I have this question for you , experts in extraction techniques : What do you understand by Full Spectrum ? What must be taken out of your extract for it to be called still a full spectrum ? Solvent yes if alcohol, but what else do you not want in there?
    Thanks
    Angel

    Hello everyone,
    I started this journey starting in 1971. Like everything nowadays we want to remove parts of a plant and throw the rest away.

    I began an R & D breeding program in 2007 strictly on CBD cannabis strains.

    I now have 2 amazing strains.
    Santa Cruz Tsunami CBD birth 2014
    CL62 CBD birth 2015

    I have worked with some of the best in all extraction methods.

    To me, I want every part possible from the plant. Ethanol right now has made the best oils so far and placed in a 40-micron Sublingal spray best delivery system period.

    Thanksgiving I went home and one of the guests was complaining of a bad headache. So in front of everyone, she did 1 spray under the tongue. She said that a headache was getting better. That was 30 seconds after the spray and in 5 minutes completely gone for the rest of the night. Her husband walked up to me when they were leaving and said she has tried many medicines but never seen what happened tonight.

    Sorry for the story. I am still looking for the best extraction method. My research tells me a 7-ton press with the right heat on the plates should produce what I am looking for. For now, Ethonal is working best.

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